The Sleeping Beauty

Ballet by Marcia Haydée after Charles Perrault

The Sleeping Beauty

Ballet by Marcia Haydée after Charles Perrault
https://www.stuttgarter-ballett.de/ Stuttgarter Ballett Oberer Schloßgarten 6, 70173 Stuttgart

For families
The Sleeping Beauty
Sat 11. Dec / 13:30
Opernhaus / Please note: Different time than usual! 12:45
https://www.stuttgarter-ballett.de/ Stuttgarter Ballett Oberer Schloßgarten 6, 70173 Stuttgart

The Sleeping Beauty
Sat 11. Dec / 19:00
Opernhaus
https://www.stuttgarter-ballett.de/ Stuttgarter Ballett Oberer Schloßgarten 6, 70173 Stuttgart

The Sleeping Beauty
Tue 5. Jul
Opernhaus
https://www.stuttgarter-ballett.de/ Stuttgarter Ballett Oberer Schloßgarten 6, 70173 Stuttgart

The Sleeping Beauty
Wed 6. Jul
Opernhaus
https://www.stuttgarter-ballett.de/ Stuttgarter Ballett Oberer Schloßgarten 6, 70173 Stuttgart

The Sleeping Beauty
Thu 7. Jul
Opernhaus
https://www.stuttgarter-ballett.de/ Stuttgarter Ballett Oberer Schloßgarten 6, 70173 Stuttgart

The Sleeping Beauty
Tue 12. Jul
Opernhaus
https://www.stuttgarter-ballett.de/ Stuttgarter Ballett Oberer Schloßgarten 6, 70173 Stuttgart

The Sleeping Beauty
Wed 13. Jul
Opernhaus
https://www.stuttgarter-ballett.de/ Stuttgarter Ballett Oberer Schloßgarten 6, 70173 Stuttgart

The Sleeping Beauty
Thu 14. Jul
Opernhaus
Further dates
The Sleeping Beauty
Choreography
Marcia Haydée nach Marius Petipa
Staging
Marcia Haydée
Music
Peter Tschaikowsky
Stage and Costumes
Jürgen Rose
Lighting
Dieter Billino
World Premiere
10. Mai 1987, Stuttgarter Ballett
Conductor
Wolfgang Heinz, Staatsorchester Stuttgart
3 hours and 30 minutes, 2 breaks
Prinzessin Aurora
Rocio Aleman
** Cast changed
Long before Angelina Jolie appeared as Malificent on the silver screen, Marcia Haydée re-interpreted the role of the “evil” fairy Carabosse in her ground breaking 1987 production of The Sleeping Beauty. With gender-bending choreography and spectacular – and equally ambiguous – costuming by designer Jürgen Rose, Haydée created a tour de force role for dance legend Richard Cragun, a role which to this day fascinates audiences and inevitably steals the show.

Haydée had had many encounters with the Petipa classic long before she created her own production: it was the first ballet she ever saw as a child and she danced in various versions including in Bronislava Nijinska’s for the Marquis de Cuevas Ballet, as well as Nicolas Beriozoff’s and Rosella Hightower’s for the Stuttgart Ballet. When she auditioned for John Cranko in 1961, she danced variations from The Sleeping Beauty for him and gave her debut in Stuttgart in the Bluebird pas de deux. Her extensive knowledge of the work was therefore the solid foundation on which she built her interpretation when she created her own version in 1987 – the very first ballet she ever choreographed. “The Sleeping Beauty for me is the story of Carabosse – whose feelings and pride have been hurt, and who consequently does something malicious – and the Lilac Fairy, who counters this rage and negative energy with positive energy. And I think we all carry aspects of both of them within us. Their struggle is a universal one, one we can all relate to.”

Haydée’s focus on Carabosse, who is constantly present throughout the ballet, continues until the very end when, just as the wedding of Princess Aurora and Prince Desirée has been celebrated, she re-appears, striding slowly along in front of the panorama of fairy-take characters, a menacing reminder that she has not been banished and will, in time, return.

Synopsis

Prologue
After many years of childlessness, a girl is born to the king and queen. For the christening of their daughter they hold a brilliant celebration. Among the invited guests are six fairies, who bring gifts and good wishes for the princess. The little companions of the fairies give Aurora small rose bushes. Suddenly the sky darkens and amidst thunder and lightning the fairy Carabosse appears. Catalabutte, the master of ceremonies, looks at the list of invited guests and sees with horror that he has forgotten to invite her. Full of anger at this disrespect, Carabosse curses the child instead of giving her good wishes. Carabosse predicts that, on her sixteenth birthday, the princess will prick her finger on a spindle and die. The dismay of the King and Queen and the other guests is mitigated by the Lilac Fairy, who counters the curse of the angry fairy: After the prick of the spindle Aurora will fall into a hundred-year sleep, from which she will be awakened by the kiss of a young prince.
Interlude
As the years pass, Aurora grows up, protected and accompanied by the blessing of the Lilac Fairy. Carabosse, however, never lets the little princess out of her sight patiently waiting for her curse to come true.
Act I
Aurora's birthday

Four princes come to Aurora's sixteenth birthday party to court the young princess. The rose bushes that she received at her christening have meanwhile become stately hedges. A gift from the fairy Carabosse arouses her special interest: a bouquet of roses. She does not suspect that the evil fairy has hidden a spindle in it. Before she knows it, she pricks her finger, and Carabosse rejoices at the fulfillment of her curse: The princess falls to the ground apparently dead. But the Lilac Fairy transforms death into a deep slumber and everything in the castle falls asleep with the princess. A high hedge of thorns grows around the castle and the garden. The Lilac Fairy extends her blessing over the sleeping court and protects it.

Act II
100 years later: Hunting scene, Prince Desirè's vision and Aurora's awakening

Prince Desiré is hunting with a large entourage. When the hunting party is some distance away, the Lilac Fairy appears to him. She shows him a vision of Princess Aurora, whose image instantly enchants his heart. The Lilac Fairy makes it clear to the prince that his luck is not far away – and leads him to the sleeping young girl. Carabosse tries to stop the prince but with the assistance of the Lilac Fairy Desiré succeeds in outwitting her. Captivated by the princess’ charm he embraces her and awakens her with a kiss. This kiss and the emotion of the two lovers is the most powerful force against the malice of Carabosse. The court awakens from the hundred-year sleep.

Act III
Aurora's wedding

The wedding of Princess Aurora with Prince Desiré is celebrated as a glamorous costume party and every member of the court is disguised as a fairy tale character. At the height of the feast, Aurora and Prince Desiré dance a great Pas de deux. The Lilac Fairy gives her blessing to the union of the two lovers. Lurking at a distance, Carabosse watches them enviously. The evil continues to exist.

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